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Technical update

Top three engines examined following Donington Park

 

Over the past ten years, RKB-F1 Motorsport has striven to develop and evolve the championship in every direction. This evolution covers a complete range of topics, from series image, quality of racing and reliability of machinery to the very basics such as team appearance, on-track discipline and paddock behaviour.

Since the introduction of the new 600cc rule, and the abolition of large engines, the playing field has become much more level, and the very close nature of the racing has been emphasised. This is a positive move in terms of the spectacle, and one which was largely expected.

Races are now won or lost on smoothness, corner speed, maintaining momentum and downright skill and track-craft. With this equal balance of engine power, the rider and passenger can no longer rely on huge horsepower to “point and squirt” in a straight line. The key word here is “equal”, and there are rules in place to ensure that is the case. RKB-F1 has built into the regulations a system whereby the right is reserved to strip at random, engines following any event.

There is also a mechanism in place to facilitate a direct protest should one, or more competitors have a suspicion that someone is using a tuned, or non-standard engine.

Those rules governing the technical specification of engines, are quite detailed, but are laid out clearly in the regulations for anyone to view.

Basically such obvious items as capacity, cam size and profile, inlet and exhaust port size and shape, and pistons, are key components, and should remain standard items.

Following the latest round at Donington Park, the top three outfits from race one, (co-incidentally the three machines branded Santander Salt), were stripped under the supervision of Colin Hurst, the designated technical officer for MSV, and all found to be within the guidelines and correct.

As an additional measure, the Honda CBR600 of Todd Ellis/Chaz Richardson was subjected to a greater degree of scrutiny to include pistons. Again, these were found to be standard items, and totally compliant with the regulations.

The Honda CBR 600 is immensely successful as a tuned version, and has performed well in the Isle of Man TT, but is not generally the motor of choice in standard form. However, performances by Todd Ellis and Rob Biggs this season, might well be justification for a rethink in this area.

Media Matters - Barry Nutley - barry.nutley@btinternet.com

 

BSB / British Sidecar Championship Partners

Race Winner, Todd Ellis and Charlie Richardson, Market Rasen, Santander Salt leads Steve Kershaw and Stuart Clark, Lauder, Molson & Express Tyre Service

Race Winner, Todd Ellis and Charlie Richardson, Market Rasen, Santander Salt leads Steve Kershaw and Stuart Clark, Lauder, Molson & Express Tyre Service

Race Winner, Todd Ellis and Charlie Richardson, Market Rasen, Santander Salt leads Steve Kershaw and Stuart Clark, Lauder, Molson & Express Tyre Service

Race Winner, Todd Ellis and Charlie Richardson, Market Rasen, Santander Salt leads Steve Kershaw and Stuart Clark, Lauder, Molson & Express Tyre Service

Photos copyright: Impact Images Photography

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